Three Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Carpenter Bees

Carpenter Bees
Carpenter Bees

As if it wasn’t bad enough dealing with carpenter ants and termites, carpenter bees are also a source of aggravation for NJ homeowners. These pests have a nasty habit of tunneling into wooden structures like decks and porches. Males can also be aggressive during spring mating season, hovering annoyingly as you try to relax outside.

While it’s visually difficult to distinguish carpenter bees from bumblebees, they do have some significant differences. Here are some facts you may not know about these insects.

  • Unlike bumblebees that nest in the ground in social communities, carpenter bees live alone, burrowing into wooden structures. Another telltale sign is on the upper side of the abdomen, which is shiny and hairless on a carpenter bee.
  • While male carpenter bees may put up a macho front, sometimes even flying directly into you, they cannot sting. On the other hand, female carpenter bees can sting but rarely do so unless provoked to the point of feeling threatened.
  • Carpenter bees do not eat wood like termites do. Problems arise when they are left to tunnel into the same structure year after year, which can result in serious structural damage.

Have you noticed bees lurking around the deck of your NJ home? Don’t try to solve the problem on your own. Contact us for safe and effective extermination of carpenter bees or any other insect or animal pests.